“Nature in the Dark”

I attended this conference in Bendigo 4th November 2014. The video is worth watching.

“How are we, as humans, going to adapt to life on Earth? An odd question when we have been so spectacularly successful.As with many evolutionary misfits before us, it’s the scale of our success that is causing the destruction of our habitat.” Freya Mathews  Adjunct Professor of Environmental Philosophy at La Trobe University, where she co-coordinates Environmental Culture Research.

Barrier Fences

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THIS PHOTO HAS NOT BEEN DOCTORED

Australia 2014 is STILL building barrier fences to keep ‘vermin’ i.e. emus out of agricultural areas, directly across the bird’s migration route, the same bird that’s on our Coat of Arms!  Working with the character if the country is the obvious direction agriculture and governments should take, not simply altering a landscape to suit a market need.

“This example from Western
Australia corresponds with what’
is seen by many as a growing trend
for governments in Australia to
defend their land-use decisions by
ignoring, dismissing or contradicting
existing robust research on ecological
impacts of particular activities
(see, e.g. Fitzsimons 2012; Lindenmayer
2013).”

emus

Heres the full story;

https://euanritchie.files.wordpress.com/2014/09/ecological-connectivity-or-barrier-fence-critical-choices-on-the-agricultural-margins-of-western-australia.pdf

Trapped Behind Wire

Rufous Hare-wallaby or Mala Largorchestes hirsutus

Mala, the smallest surviving hare-wallaby, now extinct on mainland Australia but once common in spinifex country.

Mala, the smallest surviving hare-wallaby, now extinct on mainland Australia (except behind wire)  but once common in spinifex country.

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The beautiful coat of Mala

Boodie or burrowing bettong Bettongia lesueur:   now extinct on the mainland (except behind wire) once lived in communal burrows over most of southern Australia. At Lake Mungo (NSW) huge circles of exposed light coloured earth indicate how large these systems once were. Invading rabbits simply moved into the bettong warrens displacing the marsupial owners.

Boodie young being weighed and measured, rudely interrupted from slumber by ecologist

Boodie young being weighed and measured, rudely interrupted from slumber by ecologist!

Ecologist Felicity L'Hotellier at work, Scotia Sanctuary NSW, winter 4am after starting at midnight. These people are dedicated. Understanding the biology and requirements of these animals is the first step in helping them survive in a fragmented and warming future Australia.

Field Ecologist Felicity L’Hotellier at work, Scotia Sanctuary NSW, winter 4am after starting at midnight. These people are dedicated. Understanding the biology and requirements of these animals is the first step in helping them survive in a fragmented and warming future Australia.

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The indignity of having one’s tail measured!

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Adult Burrowing bettong

Bridled Nailtail Wallaby Onychogalea fraenata: photographs do not do this animal justice. Adults present as both beautiful and tender. Joeys are even more beautiful, to my eye they have the proportions of the red kangaroo in miniature, the result is a fine and delicate creature which contrasts with its arid preferred home.

nailtail young Nailtail joey, a bucket of cuteness

By the 1950’s this wallaby along with their cousins the crescent nailtail were considered extinct everywhere but were rediscovered by an alert bushman in 1973. Once common it is now restricted to a tiny area of Qld, and also behind wire.

nailtail

Mum

 

 

EXTINCTION… the heat's on and before you know it, they're gone forever

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